ASDF

13 Apr, 2009

Registering a domain name- Intro

Posted by: admin In: tips

Computer break down means long time has past since my last post.
Interestingly enough, the page views on this blog increased drastically over the past week, I wonder if it is due to the increased popularity of Twitter. My post on Twitter layouts is surprisingly popular, despite the lack of useful information in that post. I guess I should really update it after giving some tips on domain registration.

I am not an expert in the business of domain registration, but having registered several domains myself, I do have some tips.

===========

1. It really doesn’t matter where you register it.

As long as you know the site is legit, feel free to shop for the cheapest domain registrations.
Once your domain is registered, you can transfer your registration, and/or change the nameservers to match the hosting plan you have. Your hosting company should have provided the necessary guide in their faq, so check that out.
While you should shop for the cheapest domain hosting, you need to also look for a site that is reliable. If the domain company just “poof” and disappears, the precious domain you have can be in danger of a hostile takeover.

2. Is the domain name you want taken?

There is something called “whois” (eg, http://www.whois.net/), which you can basically search for information on domain names. For example, if I search “yahoo.com”, I will get

Registrant:
Domain Administrator
Yahoo! Inc.
701 First Avenue
Sunnyvale CA 94089
US
domainadmin@yahoo-inc.com +1.4083493300 Fax: +1.4083493301

Domain Name: yahoo.com

Registrar Name: Markmonitor.com
Registrar Whois: whois.markmonitor.com
Registrar Homepage: http://www.markmonitor.com

Administrative Contact:
Domain Administrator
Yahoo! Inc.
701 First Avenue
Sunnyvale CA 94089
US
domainadmin@yahoo-inc.com +1.4083493300 Fax: +1.4083493301
Technical Contact, Zone Contact:
Domain Administrator
Yahoo! Inc.
701 First Avenue
Sunnyvale CA 94089
US
domainadmin@yahoo-inc.com +1.4083493300 Fax: +1.4083493301

Created on…………..: 1995-01-18.
Expires on…………..: 2012-01-18.
Record last updated on..: 2009-01-19.

Domain servers in listed order:

ns1.yahoo.com
ns4.yahoo.com
ns2.yahoo.com
ns5.yahoo.com
ns3.yahoo.com

So if the search says the domain name you want is available, be quick and register it!
Beware of using whois on a sketchy domain registration site though. There are some sites out there which logs these searches, and registers the domain name you might want and offer resell it to you at a significantly higher price. From what I see, domain registrations for .com are about $10/month. And you really should not pay more than that.

3. Do you need to give them your private info?

This is something that is quite scary (to me). It is illegal for you (or so I have heard) to provide false information in your domain registration, and so anyone who does a whois can potentially see your real name, phone number, and address. Most domain registration company can mask such information, and override it with their company info and say something like “private registrant”. Some sites like godaddy.com charge extra for such masking. Be sure to check out if your domain registration company comes with such masking for free. It is one of the possible hidden costs in domain registration. My domain registration at dreamhost provides this service for free, and so I still only pay $10/yr for my domain.

4. What are nameservers?

You can wikipedia it, but for the true noob (like me), I still have no clue how nameservers really work, but if your domain registration and hosting are from 2 different companies, you will need to change the nameservers in your domain registration to correspond to the ones provided by your hosting company. Take a look at the yahoo whois again, see that:

Domain servers in listed order:

ns1.yahoo.com
ns4.yahoo.com
ns2.yahoo.com
ns5.yahoo.com
ns3.yahoo.com

Most name servers have the ns(number).domain.com. In order for your domain to be linked to your site (what you put in the folders for your hosting plan), you need to set this nameserver thing properly.

It should be easy to change the name servers, but remember to unlock your domain before you change the nameserver, and lock it after the change. If you don’t unlock it, it is not going to be able to be linked with your hosting.

============

So the steps for registering a domain is:
1. Do a whois search.
2. If domain is not taken, find a cheap and reliable domain registration company online.
3. Check for the services provided and if there are any hidden costs.
4. Register your favorite domain!
5. Set up privacy information.
6. Set up name servers to match your hosting plan.

See, it is actually quite simple.

Next time I will have a more advanced post on how you might be able to snatch a domain that has been taken. And maybe explain what locking a domain does etc.

:)

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Transmedia storytelling

Today, Mark Warshaw came to APOC and gave a wonderful lecture on Transmedia storytelling. A concept called “mother ship” was introduced, which is basically story considered canon, and provides the setting for any transmedia storytelling.

A question was raised during our discussion, about to what extent can the transmedia strategy divert from the contents of the mother ship, and at what time can it actually help storytelling and when does it exclude audiences who are not as involved with all the various spin-offs on all platforms. And can the mother ship be eliminated once it’s transmedia world has been successfully built? An example of how transmedia storytelling can hurt its main stream audience is probably Matrix, when the majority of the movie-goers are unfamiliar with a character who unexpectedly was given a big role because she was made popular by the video game.

From a fan’s perspective, I would say that it usually really does not matter how much fan fiction defer from the mother ship, in fact, all fans can clearly distinguish between what is canon and what is not, and therefore fan fiction can even be written on the romance between two very heterosexual protagonists who might both have female romantic interests in the mother ship already. Fan fiction can be viewed as alternate universe (fan speak here), and fans often can enjoy these parallels and the mother ship at the same time.

Things do get blurry when the original producers start using a transmedia strategy. On the one hand, it does enhance the story greatly with the depth such storytelling can achieve, but audiences can be left out. often times, producers might feel compelled to incorporate elements of the plot not presented in the mother ship, but became a hit among the more involved fans. It can generate very positive feedback from the die-hard fans, but it is also dangerous as general audiences will not provide “wtf?” feedback to the producers, and such people will simply stop watching the show that they felt disconnected with. These audience simply didn’t care to visit those 10,000 pages of content made for the show online, they also won’t know that the disconnect is not because the show sucked, but because more story is told outside of the mother ship.

My point is, the mother ship is essential to any transmedia storytelling. Spin-offs are great and fun because they get to explore the parts where the mother ship did not have time to develop: awesome side kick, the romance, the technology etc. However, just like the picture in the post suggests, all these popularity originated from the mother ship. I think Mark was absolutely right when he said that the mother ship will not disappear, but might find it’s place in another medium. Very true. If Heroes the TV show were to end abruptly, fans might have a huge debate on what is canon and what is not. Heroes the series might die during the process (because all transmedia storytelling will lose its point of reference), but it is also likely that fans might all agree that the comic book is now canon, making it the new mother ship.

To some extent, I believe that even when the original producers put up new content and extend story telling outside of the mother ship, fans will always treat such content differently, as a freebie rather than some sort of canon. Sure, such content will always be cited as a authoritative source during a heated debate between two die-hard fans of the series, but if there are discrepancies between the mother ship and such content, the mother ship will always be considered canon. As long as the mother ship is consistent within itself, fans will have no problem. But if the mother ship became inconsistent due to some kind of forced, non-organic placement of elements from the other transmedia platform, the fans might be excited or be indifferent (since they know why it is there, they take it for granted), but the normal audience will most likely be confused. I personally feel that if the Matrix did not care about the video game fans, and stick with what they feel will be the best mainstream approach, not only will the mainstream audience be satisfied, the video game fans will also understand that the movie is to be considered canon, and have a “well, too bad…” feeling and won’t really care. After all, they must have liked the original Matrix enough to play the video game.

I think any transmedia strategist cannot be too caught up in the idea that they have to tell an absolutely consistent story across all platforms. Producers need to know the power of the flag ship on all fan created materials. In the old days when fan created content was still very underground and invisible, fan fiction authors would change the content of their fan fiction in consideration for unforeseen advances in the plot of the mother ship. It will be great if the producer can identify elements that are popular among both the fans and the general audience, and to incorporate that into the mother ship (after all, good content is always good content), but producers also need to keep in mind that the general audience probably don’t know what is going on. It will be a good idea to maybe have a condensed version of the spin-off be part of the show, so that the general audience can have a good understanding. Do not be afraid that the fans will say, “hey, that is so OLD!” because every fan will be excited to see the spin-off be part of the canon anyways.

Also, personally, I do not feel “choose your own adventure” type of storytelling will be the future of mainstream entertainment. We read books and watch TV shows because we want to be surprised. Much of the fun comes from trying to figure out the conspiracy, and all value of the show could be lost if you know the trick behind everything (lol spoilers!). I feel that fans create content because they often enjoy doing so. It will be great if their idea became part of the canon, but by just providing a platform for the sharing of fan fiction or mash ups could be enough for a fan to feel very involved and valued.

Fans are important. After all, with ad and movie ticket sales going down, DVD and merchandise purchases often generate the bulk of the dough nowadays. Your average audience is much less likely to buy these things than your die-hard fan (the anime industry in Japan is booming because they realized they can make crappy anime and make money from DVD sale. It is not really healthy, but that is another post.). However, as the Longtail theory has shown, it is likely that you will only have at most 20% of your audience be those die hard fans. Not to mention, these people might have become fans of the show because they hear their friends and family talk about it and watched an episode. You cannot only serve to this small group of fans, after all, if your overall number of viewers decrease, and the proportions remain the same, you will get a smaller absolute number of fans anyways. Just my 2 cents :)

PS: Picture stolen from Faris’s blog. He has a great post on transmedia storytelling that I feel that everyone should check out!

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20 hours after I uploaded my AMV on youtube, I received an email that reads:

Dear,

Your video, Irresponsible Captain Tylor AMV- One more time, one more chance, may have content that is owned or licensed by Office Augusta.

No action is required on your part; however, if you are interested in learning how this affects your video, please visit the Content ID Matches section of your account for more information.


Sincerely,
- The YouTube Team

More interestingly, the content ID Matches section tells me this:

Your video is still available worldwide.

What should I do?

No action is required on your part. In some cases ads may appear next to your video.

Under certain circumstances, you may dispute the copyright claim from Office Augusta. These may be any of the following:

* the content is mistakenly identified and is actually completely your original creation;
* you believe your use does not infringe copyright (e.g. it is fair use under US law);
* you are actually licensed by the owner to use this content.

In some cases ads may appear next to your video.

I guess YouTube has given up blocking content, but instead decided to put ads next to the video. IMHO, much smarter. Instead of making your users criminals, why not make your users someone who help you earn money? Good job YouTube.

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02 Mar, 2009

My first AMV- Irresponsible Captain Tylor

Posted by: admin In: APOC

AMV stands for Anime Music video, basically a mash-up of anime footage with any song. In Japan, the corporations are much more open with creative usage of their Intellectual Properties (ie, characters), and the fan community is also exceedingly good with not using the official pictures but come up with their own creations. In fact, the general population seem to be much more copyright law abiding than an American. It is a fine line between original creation and copyright infringement for AMVs, because AMVs do usually use footage from the anime itself, but this is not going to be a post on that.

At an American anime convention, AMV contest is often one of the major events, while in Japan, most of the distribution seems to be online. I have several American friends who love AMVs, likes to make them, and consider AMV contests the best thing at a convention. Personally, I am not a big fan of AMVs, but then it is probably because I prefer a plot over cool effects. Despite my disinterest in AMVs, I nevertheless always wanted to make one. It is really part of being an anime otaku: while I don’t spend hours and hours online watching AMVs , my friends will always show me the best ones. After watching so many good ones, you just have to try it yourself.

After realizing that the only video editing software I have is Windows Movie Maker (WMM), I settled down and decided to make an AMV featuring
Irresponsible Captain Tylor
. The choice was slightly forced since it is the only anime I have without hard subs1, but I do like Tylor.

After two and a half hours of work on WMM, which, by the way, has very limited video editing features, my first AMV was done. I would say that I am quite satisfied with it, considering I was able to make up some sort of plot with footage I captured, and I did not spend that much time on it (some people work for months on their AMVs). A lot of the cool things I would like to do cannot be done using the free WMM, but good video editing software are so expensive that it is prohibitive to the public.

After uploading to youtube, I start tracking the number of views. You know the feeling, that you don’t really care if people watch your video, but you still want to feel obliged to check? I guess youtube is really good at doing that… I will see if the AMV will get higher traffic than my other random videos.

Do I like AMVs more now that I made one myself? I have to say that one video is really enough for the experience. Watching well made AMVs is fun, but the process of making one is really quite boring… Unless of course, if I ever make one for Full Metal Panic, my favourite anime…

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  1. Hard subs are subtitles encoded into a video file. Soft subs on the other hand are subtitles in a different file and can be loaded as a layer on top of the video. Videos without subs are called RAWs, and to make an AMV, it is generally considered necessary to remove the subtitles to enhance the presentation []
Tags: ,

01 Mar, 2009

What is your homepage?

Posted by: admin In: APOC

Ok, I admit that I am having trouble coming up with a video response to a youtube video. I will say the experience of creating a youtube video is like public speaking for the first time. Not fun. So instead, I am going to share with everyone something I have been thinking about recently regarding Web design.

Think about what is the homepage for your site

My homepage is the friend page for livejournal, a page where I have access to all my friend’s entries: like a RSS reader just for livejournal, only with better layout. In order to access any of the other useful functions like the last 5 comments on my journal, who has sent me a private message, or even any livejournal announcements, I need to visit a page called “home”. However, to my knowledge, almost all of my friends only access their friend pages, and refreshes it constantly, while maybe check their home page once per day (or like me, once per month).

Lets look at facebook, the page called home is an all-in-one location for your friends’ feeds, friend invitations, event invitations, birthday reminders etc… Basically everything you need. I know I refresh my facebook home page constantly, and not my profile page. That is probably because I will get a notice in my home page if someone wrote on my wall anyways.

I am quite sure that livejournal has designed their home page to be as useful as possible, but they didn’t realize that all of their users set their friend page as their homepage instead, making the home page irrelevant since people don’t use it anyways.

Just makes me think of the importance of web analytics in recognizing these trends. If I were livejournal, I will probably put some side bars in the friend page, making the friend page serve as a hub for activities, since all the traffic is there anyways. Users often don’t behave consistently to how you designed the site to be used as, and the web is so flexible that there is no excuse not changing the functions on a page to adapt to the unexpected usage patterns.

I will share my thoughts on how small cosmetic changes can make a big difference in user experience really soon.

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17 Feb, 2009

How virtual worlds take over my life…

Posted by: admin In: Rant

aa-love-elune-425
One of my hobbies is video games. And I am a casual World of Warcraft player.

WoW is fun and relates to the real world in many ways, and one of the ways is that you can do seasonal quests such as Winter Veil (Christmas), Lunar Festival (Chinese New Year), Hallow’s End (Halloween) etc. Love is in the Air is the equivalent to Valentine’s Day in WoW.

I am not going to talk about how ironic it is to have a event in game when the day should be spent with loved ones. The concentration is on one of the achievements for the festival: the Be Mine! achievement, which is purely based on the Random Number Generator. For people unfamiliar with the game, there is a special flying mount reward for people who have completed all of the seasonal achievements, and it takes a whole year to get.

I spent the weekend hanging out at a friend’s place, and was able to get most of the achievements while hanging out with my friends and having a good time afk. But on Saturday night, I realized that the candy bag is not dropping for me… (You need to get a gift bag from a NPC every hour to attempt to get a candy bag from the gift bags). I panicked. I have spent a significant number of hours talking to 75 Elders NPCs all over Azeroth to get my Elders Achievement. If i don’t get my Candy bag by 06:00 server time on Monday, I will need to wait for a whole year to complete the achievement. I started to obsessively log on to WoW once every hour to attempt to get my candy bag.

I got a bag! And since it is made to be like your normal chalky V day candy, the type of candy you get from it is random. I got 7/8 of the required candy. Looks hopeful!

Life is cruel. After countless attempts, still no trace of my second candy bag. Time is ticking… I had up to 06:00 server time (05:00 LA time) to get my last candy. It is 03:30…. My second last chance to attempt to get the candy. After some research, I decided to follow the suggestion of someone to try my luck in Thunderbluff (the tauren capital) instead of Orgrimmar. And viola! I got a candy bag!!!!!!!!!11111

I ritually clicked the bag every minute (there is a cooldown), my heart beating fast, my palms sweating (ok, I am dramatizing, but I might as well be if I weren’t DEAD TIRED for staying up late).

10 charges. 10 longest minutes. STILL NO CANDY. I got 4 repeats for one of the candy I already had. And in the end… I was still “You’re the best!”-less.

I know have one more chance at 04:30. I might still get a bag of candy. I did not try. Laying in bed, I finally started to think about how I wasted my time on a stupid achievement (yes, i am still bitter), and how ironic it is to feel that the world hates me when it is suppose to be a loving weekend…

And the worse part? I did it to myself! But a part of me still feels the guilty pleasure in knowing that thousands of people also failed to get that achievement. Oh well, I guess there is always next year…

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13 Feb, 2009

Kogi BBQ!— The new business model

Posted by: admin In: APOC

kogi_sqI subscribe to an exclusive newsletter called UrbanDaddy, which is surprisingly good with their recommendations for LA’s restaurants, night life, and anything interesting (and expensive, eck!). It was in one of these issues that I knew about an infamous Korean BBQ taco truck (which, if you think about it, is really a brilliant idea) that people have been obsessively tracking online. As a self-acclaimed food snob, I NEED to try it out. After 1 google search, I was linked to kogi’s blog, their twitter, and showered with positive reports on Yelp! and LA Times. After dragging my friends to wait in line for over 60 minutes, I sank my teeth into some tangy meaty tacos, standing in a very cold Thursday midnight.

I am not going to comment on the taste (which I really should do on my half-defunct food blog…), but the experience of waiting in line with my friends, and with over a hundred of people in front of me was exhilarating. The uncertainty of whether you will get your food (they do sell out on some nights, we were obsessively checking twitter to make sure that it was not one of those nights), the lingering fear of getting your car towed (there were a lot of parking enforcement people around), the effects of the smell of BBQ on an empty stomach, the random eccentric girl dressed in weird clothing dancing with her tacos and being filmed by her friends (I later discovered she is a blogger, and even made a video)… are all part of the Kogi experience.

Then, a few weeks later, we unexpectedly had Mike Prasad- Brand & New Media Director for Kogi BBQ to speak to us in class. It was very enlightening to look at how Kogi operated, and how successful they new media strategy worked.

Blogging, Tweeting, outreach to the community is almost “Duh?” for anyone working in the web 2.0 business, but how many companies have successfully implemented it? The beauty of Kogi is the build up of anticipation and the mystery of a food truck that you do not know where to find if you are not in. For food, it is a great business model: people are used to waiting in lines at fast food restaurants and other taco trucks, and the smell of the food and unsatisfied hunger are a few of the only things that will keep people in line. If Kogi sell clothes, I am sure it would not have worked out the same way… (ebay!) The product and the strategy worked really well together to create the buzz needed. And the longer the line, the louder the buzz! Genius!

A few weeks passed, and UrbanDaddy once again told me about Kogi, but now it is their permanent spot within the Alibi Room. Kogi is now not only a Taco truck that you need to track via twitter, but also a stand you can get tacos every night! I have to admit that part of me feel relieved that I will know where to get my dose of Korean BBQ Tacos without working like a private detective, but another part of me is slightly disappointed … After all, you are not going to get dancing bloggers at midnight at just any taco stand. But the foodie side of me is probably still going to try out the new Kog.

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30 Jan, 2009

I am an INTP

Posted by: admin In: Rant

As a response to Nicole’s post, I am going to confess that I am a Myers-Briggs Type Indicator(MBTI) nerd. I love this stuff XD. Check out my facebook! I will love to know everyone’s personality types! It is suppose to help with social interactions and for us to know each other better. Or you can just call me curious.

Other than the: “socially uncomfortable”, “does not like happy people” (@_@ who doesn’t like happy people?), and “frequently loses things”, the description in the image paints a fairly accurate picture of my personality (you can buy the shirt here.)

Personally, I think that INTPs sound like jerks. But a very INTP response would be: we don’t really care (since we are all suppose to be emotionless, cold-hearted, manipulative villains like Voldemort) .

Since you get a percentage for Myers-Briggs, and I am only 20% leaning towards introverted, so hopefully I am much more social than stated. After all, we are in the program for online communities.

Obligatory if you want to be friends with INTP quote:

INTPs prize intelligence in themselves and in others, but can become intellectual dilettantes as a result of their need to amass ideas, principles, or understanding of behavior. And once they know something, it is remembered. INTPs can become obsessed with analysis. Once caught up in a thought process, that thought process seems to have a will of its own for INTPs, and they persevere until the issue is comprehended in all its complexity. They can be intellectual snobs and may show impatience at times with others less endowed intellectually. This quality, INTPs find, generates hostility and defensive behaviors on the part of others, who may describe an INTP as arrogant.

So sorry if I appear to be elitist and arrogant, it is my personality flaw, and please forgive me. :) (According to Walther’s SIP theory, I am :) alone. I like how academic studies just make you feel more pessimistic sometimes :( )

If you want an example of how INTPs are obsessed with analysis, try looking at the detailed description of the INTP personality type written by an INTP. It is more detailed than any other description available online for any other personality types out there. That is because all INTPs are nerds. :P

And to make this post to have at least some connection with online communities, I will link to a great forum for INTJs. Why not a forum for the INTPs? Not only are INTJs much better at maintaining a forum, the INTP forum also has  posts that make us look like bad students and the HATE !1

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  1. notice how the post about hate is the number 2 highest viewed post in the INTP forum, with the highest number of replies. This behavior is actually predicted as a stereotypical behavior as an INTP. Got to love MBTI. []
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28 Jan, 2009

Joe’s take on Tuesday’s class

Posted by: admin In: APOC

the-internet-a-series-of-tubesI hope everyone still remembers Joe who visited us during class, and he sent me a long email with his thoughts:

on ethans internet:

the idea of the internet as a protocol is not too far from the truth,but the hardware infrastructure has to be built and maintained by commercial agencies until we can at some point automate or labor-distribute the resources necessary for maintenance… and possibly some day, growth (lofty dream there, but being researched)

and the internet as we know it will only remain free if the pathways created by the interacting hardware and abstracted to protocols by said hardware remains a “neutral” tool/resource. once the pathways created by the protocol are no longer equally weighted, there will be additional, unsupportable load on the cheaper pathways.

aside: from a techie/engineering background i rarely imagine the business side of things, and it may show in my comments.

regarding the beginning of class discussion:
i was fairly impressed at the lack of a definition of community and the lack of attempt at a true definition when attempting to classify things as community. this is the engineering side of me talking: how can some thing be classified without a clear definition of the category into which it would fall?

i think that yan was the closest in answering the question of the definition of community to my own definition based on the discussion of the class (non-independent). “a resource (website?) to which users in question (aka the community) return to on a regular or semi-regular basis with the explicit goal of interacting within the structure of the resource”. of course, this means that the dating websites would be considered community. do i agree or disagree? my initial reaction is to say it is not a community.

i think that further definition is necessary if you want to objectively classify this restricted case of a community. if the intention of the members of “the community” is to interact with those they have already encountered, then the dating site may not be a community in the strictest sense unless the designers of the site facilitate and observe that emergent behavior in their system.  if a community is defined as a place where users return to have interactions with strangers, the dating site would definitely fall into the community category. personally, i prefer the former definition and would not call a dating site a community unless it does facilitate contact between returning users as “friends” or some other socially binding construct within the site’s interface.

in my mind, there has to be the expectation of continued communication with other people holding that same expectation in order to create a community. without that expectation, all that is available is simply a resource or tool.

regarding netflix:
the main question i heard from clint was not “is netflix an online community” because it seems to me that via the sharing and messaging and rating functions, the structure for an online community is already built. the question i heard was “is netflix on an appliance or otherwise non-interactive medium a community?”. my answer to that question, although i did not want to take time away from those who are actually in the program, is that it does not create a community via the medium itself (seeing as the medium does not facilitate any communication) but it does create META communities. these communities are built upon existing social communities. for example, some people where i work do have xbox360’s and they use these appliances to watch netflix movies. they now talk about the movies that they watch, even though the xbox itself only minimally supports community-like interactions. were these people not co-workers (i.e. within an existing community), they would not be involved together in a community as i define it because they would never have met to interact about the movies which they watch on netflix. that is why i call the community created by the appliance a META community: it lives on top of (and may modify) an existing social structure rather than creating the structure.

-joe

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26 Jan, 2009

Innovative advertising

Posted by: admin In: Uncategorized

While this is not online community related, it is still interesting to see the innovative ideas used to promote awareness. Brazilian environmental activists 50 Graus used methods such as letting ice penguins melt at a popular park, and surrounding a drinking fountain with a mini maze, to convey the messages of global warming and water scarcity. Got to say that they did a great job.

This shows that it really does not take a lot money to create a successful campaign; innovation is so much more important!

— from Josh Spear

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  • bullshit1000: Sorry for the typo. Also, MBTI is basically bullshit. I am mostly an introvert but there are times when I am geniunely enjoying being an extrovert. MB
  • yourFACE1000: IF you are not social uncomfortable then you CANNOT be an INTP. Sorry. Also, if you never lose things, that doesn't rule it out, but greatly reduces t
  • Martin Fisher: <> This is something that is widely misunderstood. Your 'score' doesn't define your position on some scale of introversion/extraversion. Ther

About

Welcome to my blog! I am an APOC student at the University of Southern California, and the truth is that this blog is part of my course requirement. However, I will do my best to make it as useful and informative as possible, and be more active on this blog than any of my other blogs...

I love tweaking with Wordpress layouts and web design in general, so maybe I will post some tips and links to resources and sites I like. I will try my best not to bring in too much from the anime and manga industry (and you know I am a big fan if you check out my anime list), though I am a believer that fan culture strives on the internet more than any other channel, and the study of fan culture is one of the topics that really fascinates me.

I also playes video games (like wow), loves to travel and I consider myself an ill-informed food snob. So enjoy your visit!

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